Sifsdóttir

Never let your sense of morals get in the way of doing what's right

På nåt sätt så väldigt väntat.

Ah, the feeling when you know you have the perfect first chapter.

By the way, neck protection on armour. You want it. It’s nowhere to be seen on the Durin heirs in the teaser trailer. Not on Thorin either.

I really don’t have words anymore for this man just please stop him 

My god emthroney. YOU CAN’T REBLOG THINGS LIKE THIS WHEN IT’S morning… never mind. I have to admit it, I LOVE to hate this. I hear Mark Haddlow right now, doing an inpersonfication of Thranduil. I have coffee up my nose.

Also, butterfly chrysalis. Look at that shoulder armour. Looks like they harvested an oversized Polygonia butterfly chrysalis and put it on him. Considering what you find in Mirkwood it’s certainly not impossible. Okay, only joking about the last part. But it really looks like a piece of a chrysalis.

helshades:

sifsdottir:

helshades:

sifsdottir:

mighty-thordis:

sifsdottir:

xero—sky:

sifsdottir:

So the question is, do people these days know when the autumn slaughter happens?

I sincerely doubt it. I spent part of my childhood in an area where everybody raised at least part of their own food, so it’s not a foreign concept to me, but most people don’t stop to think about where their food comes from.

That’s sad, but on the other hand, if I never have to pluck a damned chicken again, I’ll be a happy woman.

We weren’t self sufficient even if we had a farm, not by a long stretch, even if we consumed more of our produce when I was younger, compared to later. As they were pushed towards one speciality due to economic reasons - dairy in this case - naturally that which didn’t fit the production fell away which meant that we had less crops. Ergo, no home grown flour. But some things still happened, and the autumn slaughter was one of them, since meat was fairly expensive and therefore the incentive was there to eat your own animals and not buy it from a store. I think my mum would have wanted to make her own cheese, but we didn’t have the facilities. So no veal in spring. 

I don’t know if people living on the countryside in general are aware of these practices either. Most just live there these days. Farmers are few, and it’s an industry where you have one production and one alone. It’s like any manufacturing industry really so it’s quite possible that if you only have crops or egg production, you have no knowledge whatsoever about other kinds of farm production and couldn’t figure out why veal is eaten in spring. Unless you’re consulting Google, of course.

I can’t believe that I, an urban dweller in 4th-ish generation, do have knowledge concerning cattle slaughter (yeah, it is limited and generalized, but, hey, it still counts!). My farmers-relatives would have said that not everything is lost with me and I still have a chance to live as one of them. Tears of joy…

I’m glad to hear it. 

No but seriously, naturally there has to be city dwellers who knows. The question is just how many. And those who don’t, if they are capable of googling it.

Now that’s a good question, because I am wondering whether there is a lot of blood being shed at home traditionally around this time of the year. We’ve had lamb for the summer, that at least is certain. Gah—my uncle doesn’t do his own sausages anymore, I don’t know anything anymore at all. Count me in aboard the city wagon.

If it’s any comfort, I have an aunt who admitted had no idea why cows had to have a new calf now and then. And this after having grown up in a farm worker’s home and had three kids of her own.

Okay, I admit, this may have been one of my more mean moments in life. The evil cackle and the comments coming over my lips were… a bit over the top perhaps. On the other hand, she had earned it. Decades of flaunting your ignorance, stupidity and general asshole behaviour will come back to bite you. At least if you display it openly in my presence as a relative.

No, I suspect not many knows when, nor why it happens when it happens at this particular time of year. Same thing with cheese making - why it typically happens in spring.

It won’t stop me from referencing to it though, if writing something where it’s expected characters would know.

One day, I eavesdropped a conversation between teens in the ride home aboard a bus that passes a high school: my neighbours’ two daughters and the eldest’s boyfriend were arguing about burgers and from which animal they came, and how beef and cow totally weren’t the same, etc.

Concerning the matters of seasonal slaughter, I was actually right, as opposed to being completely and shamefully ignorant in my forefathers’ trade—very deep sigh of relief—because, after a short chat with my grandmother (who was sent to keep the family’s goats as soon as she was big enough to tie her own apron) I got confirmation of what I had suspected and did mention earlier: there was never any “autumn slaughter” in our regions, and in fact, no real seasonal particularity to speak of…

image

First, let’s remark that Sweden and Southern Ardèche have different climates, and we’ve always had to wait for the colder months to kill the pigs, so that meat wouldn’t fester. Then, this is mountain and scrubland we’re talking about here, cows need too much to eat and they are too heavy for the steep meadows; we’ve always had sheep and goats around here, and the lambs are born in spring. Also, piggies.

Ardèche is the Rhône Valley, a wine country, and in autumn the most important thing to happen is probably grape harvest; we also grow lots and lots of chestnuts, and my own lands are currently covered in wide nets as I write. Also, of course, people hunt, especially for wild boars.

Two generations ago, both my maternal and my paternal families were actually self-sufficient. Beasts, vegetables, fruit, and dairy products on very different farms—it’s Isère on my father’s side, so cows definitely happened over there—but times change, and my paternal grandparents became factory workers, my mother’s father a bus driver, and her uncle is old and not moving much anymore. He used to keep a small orchard and a bigger vegetable garden, though, grow potatoes, and make his own delicatessen; some things, such as oil, butter, cheese and eggs, he would trade with neighbours, since he hadn’t kept beasts in a long time.

Naturally it depends on where you are in the word and what kind of animals you keep. Autumn slaughter in Europe is common all the way down to the Balkans, so it’s not just in the north, but the harsher the climate, the more strict you must be.

The animals you don’t want to feed in winter you get rid of before winter sets in; pigs, cattle, lamb and geese for instance. It’s as simple as that. Also, cooler temperatures makes it easier to handle meat and keep it from being spoiled before it’s properly preserved.

The reason you may come across veal in spring is becaue you want the rennet for making cheese. You sacrifice a bull calf still on milk diet, eat the meat and make your cheese.

mighty-thordis:

sifsdottir:

So the question is, do people these days know when the autumn slaughter happens?

I can’t believe that I, an urban dweller in 4th-ish generation, do have knowledge concerning cattle slaughter (yeah, it is limited and generalized, but, hey, it still counts!). My farmers-relatives would have said that not everything is lost with me and I still have a chance to live as one of them. Tears of joy…

I’m glad to hear it. 

No but seriously, naturally there has to be city dwellers who knows. The question is just how many. And those who don’t, if they are capable of googling it.

useless-swedenfacts:

im so angry you have no idea. it isn’t even halloween yet.

It’s sold from October 1st, every year. The same date IKEA begins their attacks on us with Christmas decorations.
useless-swedenfacts:

im so angry you have no idea. it isn’t even halloween yet.

It’s sold from October 1st, every year. The same date IKEA begins their attacks on us with Christmas decorations.

useless-swedenfacts:

im so angry you have no idea. it isn’t even halloween yet.

It’s sold from October 1st, every year. The same date IKEA begins their attacks on us with Christmas decorations.

Darling: *looking up from the laptop screen after a cursory glance at my Tumblr dash*

Darling (disdain loud and clear in his voice, almost spitting the word): Smokenshield.

Me: *snort* *cackle* 

Me: *struggling with getting my facial expression under control*

Me: What?

Darling: *arching eyebrow in my direction*

Me: Well, he’s a distinguished gentleman.

Darling: He’s a dwarf.

Me: And?

Darling: You’re on this boat too?

Me: *patting him on his arm*

Me: You’re okay, even if you don’t have grey streaks and is 6’5.

The daggers he glared… steampagan, you’re to blame. I mean, I’m not on that boat, but I couldn’t help myself… (And I didn’t reveal that Richard Armitage is nearly as tall as him.

xero—sky:

sifsdottir:

So the question is, do people these days know when the autumn slaughter happens?

I sincerely doubt it. I spent part of my childhood in an area where everybody raised at least part of their own food, so it’s not a foreign concept to me, but most people don’t stop to think about where their food comes from.

That’s sad, but on the other hand, if I never have to pluck a damned chicken again, I’ll be a happy woman.

We weren’t self sufficient even if we had a farm, not by a long stretch, even if we consumed more of our produce when I was younger, compared to later. As they were pushed towards one speciality due to economic reasons - dairy in this case - naturally that which didn’t fit the production fell away which meant that we had less crops. Ergo, no home grown flour. But some things still happened, and the autumn slaughter was one of them, since meat was fairly expensive and therefore the incentive was there to eat your own animals and not buy it from a store. I think my mum would have wanted to make her own cheese, but we didn’t have the facilities. So no veal in spring. 

I don’t know if people living on the countryside in general are aware of these practices either. Most just live there these days. Farmers are few, and it’s an industry where you have one production and one alone. It’s like any manufacturing industry really so it’s quite possible that if you only have crops or egg production, you have no knowledge whatsoever about other kinds of farm production and couldn’t figure out why veal is eaten in spring. Unless you’re consulting Google, of course.

helshades:

sifsdottir:

So the question is, do people these days know when the autumn slaughter happens?

Now that’s a good question, because I am wondering whether there is a lot of blood being shed at home traditionally around this time of the year. We’ve had lamb for the summer, that at least is certain. Gah—my uncle doesn’t do his own sausages anymore, I don’t know anything anymore at all. Count me in aboard the city wagon.

If it’s any comfort, I have an aunt who admitted had no idea why cows had to have a new calf now and then. And this after having grown up in a farm worker’s home and had three kids of her own.

Okay, I admit, this may have been one of my more mean moments in life. The evil cackle and the comments coming over my lips were… a bit over the top perhaps. On the other hand, she had earned it. Decades of flaunting your ignorance, stupidity and general asshole behaviour will come back to bite you. At least if you display it openly in my presence as a relative.

No, I suspect not many knows when, nor why it happens when it happens at this particular time of year. Same thing with cheese making - why it typically happens in spring.

It won’t stop me from referencing to it though, if writing something where it’s expected characters would know.

So the question is, do people these days know when the autumn slaughter happens?